Friday, February 06, 2009

raven_0476 web

Look how much light leaks in at the corners with my standard kit D300. I don't mind it for the most part, but find it surprising since I only use one lens and it should be airtight.

15 comments:

simon said...

Is it shot wide open? Sometimes with canon and nikon lenses when you shoot them wide open they have vignette.

Liz said...

I think it's vignetting, not light leaks.

zs said...

Duh! Thanks you two. Of course, this shot was wide open but I was shooting in program and didn't even think about that. I should learn how to use a camera at some point. But doesn't the vignetting seem extreme with this? And there are some light leaks with this body and lens and I've found that I occasionally need to detach and reattach the lens to prevent it... it's a leak in the upper left corner. This is undoubtably my own fault because I'm so hard on things.

Liz said...

I'm definitely not an expert so take what I say with a grain of salt, but I think that, given the overall color and darkness of the image, the vignetting seems normal. Maybe someone else will comment with more info?

zs said...

You are way more of an expert than me and I totally believe you. Liz, you know what you're talking about!

stefan abrams said...

Hey,
The vignetting is not normal as far as I am concerned. I have it with my lens and the d300, I bought the body and used my lens from my d70. It is a sign that the lens is not covering the sensor properly. The lens throws a circle of light on the sensor, it always fades out at the edges, but the circle should be big enough that the fade is way beyond the edge of the sensor. That is caused by inadequate coverage.

zs said...

Thanks Stefan, it's a disappointing feature on a camera that I generally love, but I had really hoped I could operate as fully automatic with my giving no thought at all to settings when I'm working in program. This vignetting seems extreme and is actually way worse with the D300 although I had it with the D70 too. I generally don't mind it, or the upper corner leak, because I'm fine with a small glitch or the possibility of imperfection when I'm making an image, and the idea that the "ye olde" vignette or leak is happening with this new camera is interesting. However, this is a really fucking expensive camera and my relaxed approach is fine for me, but not for most other photographers and I'm a little pissed off to hear it's happening to you as well. Have you found that your sensor is often dirty as well, or is that just me?

Enough camera talk.... CONGRATULATIONS TO STEFAN ABRAMS!
PA Council on the Arts Winner

Patti Hallock said...

Zoe--I have the same thing when I shoot with my zoom lens on my Canon 5D. It's a coverage issue and common with zoom lenses--The 5d is also notoriously bad with getting dust on the sensor. Especially bad out here in a dry climate. Gotta clean it every time I shoot. Did you hear SPE in 2010 is in PHL??? I'm psyched!

PS--you can fix that vignette in Camera Raw

albert said...

Looking at the EXIF info of your flickr photos, looks like you're using the Nikkor 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 which isn't the greatest of Nikon glass out there, but the coverage can't be beat other than the 18-200mm VR. As Patti said, the vignetting can be corrected in ACR.

It'll be better/worse depending on various conditions. This frame actually wasn't wide open, but at f/8 which makes the extreme vignetting even odder.

When you open up the .nef file in PS and the ACR window opens up, click on the tab 3rd from the right which looks like a camera lens internal diagram [Lens Corrections]. On the bottom part of that panel, 'Lens Vignetting' will be an option. Slide the upper slider to the right to correct and the bottom slider to fine tune.

Me, I'm a fan of vignetting.

Christopher Paquette said...

get yourself a really decent prime lens.... 50mm.... 85mm... whatever.
Once you start using one, you will never go back to a telephoto.

To me, image quality is far superior with a prime lens.

stefan abrams said...

Hey

I haven't had problems with the sensor being dirty on the d300. I had a piece of dust on my d70 sensor that was really annoying. Generally I never change the lens, but sometimes I rent a lens and am changing it all the time, which makes me nervous as that seems to be when the sensor can get dirty. I try not to do that wearing a wool sweater. Took me years to figure that one out. I am not so particular about my photo techniques and vignetting for the most part does not bother me, but in that photo you posted that is pretty extreme. I also think it is bizarre that it is a bit of the 19th century in your $1800. digital camera. Obviously in most images it will not show as much as in an image of a white sky. One thing that I have learned is the more I shoot, the more knowing certain technical things help. But one must always ask why is it that so many of the people that obsess over technique make the most boring images?

stefan abrams said...

btw, one thing that i do know is never try to clean your sensor yourself, you will really fuck the camera up. much better to have it done by a pro, if you can live with our the camera for that long

zs said...

I would NEVER clean my own sensor, it makes me nervous to change lenses!

albert said...

if you ever need your sensor cleaned, lemme know. i've been doing it for 4 years or so now. it's VERY easy.

zs said...

Albert Yee, you I trust to clean my sensor and will take you up on your offer. Me? Despite wishing otherwise, cleaning of any kind is not my long suit.